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To hire a proofreader or not to hire a proofreader? That is the question…

4 Mar
Perhaps a proofreader is needed?

Perhaps a proofreader is needed?

 

I often get asked the question of whether an organisation or an individual should hire a proofreader. In today’s day and age, budget is always the defining factor and quite frankly many small businesses can’t afford it. However, these businesses should perhaps consider reputation management.

Think about yourself as an individual, trawling the net for information on a product or service. You come across different sites that are offering the same thing, but how do you choose who to get in touch with?

As we all know, first impressions count and can be lasting. In our age of speed a business has about 10 seconds to make that impression to a potential client.

You click-through to the first site which is simple, clean, easy to understand and is well written. You keep that in your armour of potentials.

As you click-through to the next site there is a surprise waiting for you. It is simple and clean but difficult to understand and is littered with errors. How do you feel about this site? I’m guessing not too impressed. It shows a lack of attention to detail and can come across as a lack of caring as well. If their website is littered with errors what does that say about their quality of work? They are crossed off the list of potentials immediately.

Proofreading is always important to maintaining that critical first impression, so consider hiring a proofreader as part of your budget.

If you are a cash strapped small business and don’t have the budget perhaps ask a friend to cast a quick glance over your copy? It is unlikely that all errors will be caught, but it can be a cheaper way of getting a second set of eyes on your work. Not everybody can be a proofreader, but this could help you in the interim while you’re making your millions! Once you get to a point of being able to afford a service like this, it should be a critical part of your budget process.

What are your thoughts on hiring proofreaders? I would like to hear. Watch out for my next post of whether you should hire a copywriter or not.

Image copyright belongs to Mark Parisi

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Proofreaders make your newsletters “right as rain”

5 Feb

Welcome to Lindsay McLoughlin as a guest blogger! I am so pleased to have you on-board and thank you for a wonderful article.

Writers cannot proofread their own words.

I recently heard a story about an organisation which produced a monthly newsletter. Before pressing the send button, the writer circulated the newsletter around the office for everyone to proofread. To a man, everyone missed the typo in Rebecca, who featured frequently within the content and was on the mailing list. The writer and his colleagues were too close to the content; a proofreader would have picked this mistake up in no time, making the newsletter right as rain!

“Right as rain” means absolutely fine, perfect, ready to go. Its monosyllabic alliteration adds to its appeal and there is a definite ring to it. Perhaps that’s why it has stood the test of time, outliving its “forefathers” – right as a gun… right as a line… right as a trivet or, even, right as my leg!

Proofreaders check for glitches, misnomers, howlers! They check for typing, grammatical or punctuation errors but also for misalignment, inconsistencies with fonts, wording, styles and other details. They have the benefit of being one step removed from the material. The copy is new to them; they are using a fresh pair of eyes.

“Rebecca’s mistake” may not have been a howler by any means but, from everyone’s point of view, material that is right as rain – or right as my leg – has a much greater impact! It could be said that asking a proofreader to look the material over is like asking for a “rain check”!

Photo credit: rabasz / Foter.com / CC BY-NC-ND

About the Author: Lindsay McLoughlin runs www.proofedbylinds.co.uk, a proofreading and copywriting service for web, print and publicity materials. She works with business owners and marketing companies to polish and improve marketing and business materials.

Lindsay McLoughlin

Lindsay McLoughlin

Do proofreaders make mistakes?

1 Feb

I know we are very close to perfect, of course, but proofreaders are also human! I know it sounds rather unbelievable that perhaps we could make mistakes…however, occasionally it does happen. But why?

We occassionally do make mistakes...

We occasionally do make mistakes…

Mistakes often occur within our own writing…in fact I got caught out the other day on Twitter with a mistake, and the picture above shows exactly how I felt. The reason that mistakes often occur within our own work, is that we are not fresh to it. When you are close to something, your eye somehow reads what is meant to be there, and not necessarily what is there.

Why should you hire a proofreader?

One of the biggest reasons to hire a proofreader is the fact that they are fresh to your content and are skilled at what they do. Being fresh to the content makes it much easier for proofreaders to spot mistakes than it would be for you, the writer.

I guess the question to ask is whether a proofreader could make a mistake if you hire them in a professional capacity? As I said earlier, I know we are close to perfect, but it is possible!  The chances of errors occurring with a proofreader are far less likely. Remember though to be kind, we are human and occasionally we make mistakes!

Should you accept mistakes?

It depends on how many mistakes and how often they occur? If you hire a proofreader and their work is littered with errors, then you clearly need to look for someone else, as this is not acceptable.

One or two errors may be forgivable, but should never be a regular occurrence.

I remember quite some time ago that I had missed an ‘s’ off the end of a word whilst proofreading a 67,000 word thesis. I sent it through cyberspace to the proud owner, and after the fact decided to do my fourth glance over the document. I was mortified that I had actually missed this! Luckily I spotted the error before the author did, quickly amended it and sent it winging its way back through cyberspace with head held low.

So, in short, we are human and mistakes do happen. However, as I mentioned before, this should never be a regular occurrence…if it is a regular occurence, that’s when you should get the next person in pronto!

Online proofreading programmes put to the test. Can they replace the human kind?

28 Jan

By the human kind I mean someone like me of course. I’m sure you can already guess that I am going to fight for my little place in humanity as a proofreader and editor, but as they say ‘the proof is in the pudding’. So let’s see if online programmes can replace us humans! With proofreading being such a critical element of business communications, I wanted to put some online programmes to the test and see the results. As you can see from the image below, getting the details right are so important.

I think an online programme may not have picked up this error...

I think an online programme may not have picked up this error…

Although I was highly doubtful that these programmes could replace us human proofreaders, there was a slight moment of trepidation before I embarked on my test!

Which programmes were tested?

I tried a variety of different programmes, which all claim to be able to highlight spelling and grammatical errors amongst others. I won’t mention names, but most of the bigger online proofreading services were tested. I also included Word, for a more complete picture, although from experience I knew that not all errors could be detected.

How did I approach the test?

I used an article that I had recently written for a parenting website and littered it with errors. I’ve included the test article below for you to take a look at…I think the errors are quite plain to see.

The importance of art…can it help ADHD children

What the benefits of art?

I have always been very interested in art and drawing, and when I had my little boy for some he was just not interested in art at all – that’s all changed but more on that later!

Art is an incredibly powerful for children and has heeps of benefits, here are some:

  • It develops their fine motor skills as well as muscle tone in the upper body;
  • They can express themselves creativly and there is lods of research that shows the art helps stimulate language – it is a type of language which helps them to talk about their world;
  • Art helps children to discover and learn – think about colours, shapes, textures and cognitive thinking to name a few;
  • Art is a great emotion release;
  • The physical movement of art can bee very calming.

There has also been a lot of research in to the other benefit of art…

  • Early exposure too visual art, music or drama stimulates brain activity;
  • Art helps children understand other subjects more easier;
  • It encourages inventiveness, helps with development of selfesteem, selfdiscipline, co-operation and self motivation;
  • It help them to creatively problem solve.

Art and ADHD

Very often children who are active minded, for example an ADD or ADHD child, struggle to concentrate or sit still for drawing, but there are ways to encourage art.

Art can help a child to concentrate, slow down and stabilise. As weve mentioned earlier it is a good emotion outlet and helps with stabilising mood and building self-esteem. My little boy is active minded and did not like art for the first 5 years his life…and I didn’t know how to encourage it. What often happens is once they realise they can draw, and feel proud of themself, they are off like rockets. It was amazing to see ny little boy going from zero to hero…he is now proud of his art that he carries his art books everywhere with him. With these active little minds they really need a non-competitive area of master, and art is often the answer. Art is used for so many therapies and has a very calming effect.

10 Tips to encourage your little artist…

If your children are not interested in art, here are a few tips to encourage them to get drawing!

  1. First start small and simple and make sure you work with child;
  2. You might find that initially, especially if they are quite active, that they are disinterested, restless and questioning the time. If this is the case make sure you give lots of attention and sit with them while they drawing;
  3. Find what interests your child – often children have particular interests…start with a particular and let them colouring in first and then you can move to drawing. For example boys might love pirates or cars and girls might like Barbie! Work with what you no;
  4. Children love to work with new things…so if you have new materials the time this will often spark a creative interest. I use egg boxes, cereal boxes, lids of wipes, leaves, foil…anything that I can lay my hand on;
  5. You can let them stand, lie on the floor or neel if they struggle to sit still and make sure they can have break if they need to;
  6. Compliment, compliment, compliment and build pride – praise is fantastic for a child’s self-esteem. Tell them how great the drawing and if they are old enough get them to talk about it with you. Try not to ask what it is as this can sometimes leave them feels like they haven’t accomplished anything.
  7. If  your child has just done a pencil drawing, try and encourage them to add extra for example colours.
  8. Build pride in their work – once it is completed, hang it up somewhere and make fuss about the art. This will encourage them to do it mor.
  9. NEVER throw their art away – if you do this, you can be guaranteed that they won’t want to do it again!

Good luck!

What were the results?

  • All the programmes highlighted the glaring spelling errors;
  • None of them, besides Word, picked up the spelling errors that were grammatically incorrect, for example where I have used ‘too’ instead of ‘to’;
  • None of the programmes picked up the fact that there are only 9 bullet points.  At the beginning of the list I clearly state ’10 Tips…’;
  • None of them picked up ‘…it is a good emotion outlet’, where it should quite obviously be ‘…it is a good emotional outlet’;
  • Some, but not all, highlighted the punctuation errors.

Although this list may seem small and inconsequential, these are the absolute basics of proofreading and editing – spelling, grammar, punctuation and consistency. Get these wrong and you have wasted your time and effort. I have only highlighted some of the results to give you an idea of the general theme of the tests.

So, can these programmes replace us?

Happily no, no, no, no!!!! Yes humans, we still have a very important role to play. Proofreaders and editors – 1. Technology – 0!

If you need any help with proofreading or editing, please feel free to contact me at anytime.

A simple guide to the difference between proofreading and editing

20 Jan

The words proofreading and editing are often confused as the same thing, but in fact they are quite different. Take a look at the checklist so that you’re easily able to identify which service you would need.

A simple guide to the difference between proofreading and editing

A simple guide to the difference between proofreading and editing

20 more weird and wonderful words…

17 Jan

I know I did a similar post a couple of days ago (although these are of course different), but I just can’t help myself in my mission to find the weird and wonderful words out there. I challenge you to use at least one of these in a conversation over the next couple of days and see the response you get…I’m certainly going to try. I do however see myself hidden in the bathroom with my cheat sheet of words, scheming how to randomly drop them into sentences and then forgetting what they mean in the first place! Take a look and share your own…

More weird and wonderful words

More weird and wonderful words

  1. Risorial – something that causes you to laugh. Yes, I do want a risorial moment.
  2. Misopediayou hate children, but worse even is that this specifically means to hate your own! I do hope I never experience misopedia.
  3. Zateticto question or ponder upon something.
  4. Wheepleto try and whistle loudly, but monumentally failing! I definitely wheeple a lot…I just cannot whistle!
  5. Antingantinga lucky charm.
  6. Aposiopesisstopping an idea in mid-sentence. Um, yes, I can definitely relate to this!
  7. Aeolistic a person who is very long-winded and boring. I have come across many in my time…in fact one of our friends was only allowed to say five words, otherwise we’d all fall asleep.
  8. Limosisa strong urge to eat chalk. Well, maybe it’s tasty.
  9. Discalceateto take your shoes off. I think my family would think I was rather strange if I called from the bedroom “I’m just discalceating”.
  10. Carwitchet a funny pun.
  11. Novercaphobiaan abnormal fear of your step-mother. Is this not normal?
  12. Thibblea stick for stirring porridge.
  13. Acclumsidclumsy, numbed or paralysed.
  14. Abliguritionspending an abnormally high amount of money on food. I suspect I might have this problem…don’t we all?
  15. Calamistrateto curl your hair.
  16. Dactylonomycounting on your fingers.
  17. Fludgshurry up! I would love to confuse the morning chaos with “Come, fludgs”. Perhaps then the family would hear me?
  18. Gangrelwhen a child is just starting to walk. Perhaps toddler is a bit more user-friendly?
  19. Hautainto be proud or arrogant. I will definitely throw this word into my next meeting with an arrogant person – that could put them off.
  20. Infucateto use make-up. “Hold on darling, I’m just infucating.”

You might know some of these, you might not…but please bring on the weird and wonderful!

I used a couple of sources to bring all these together, so thanks to www.fictionpress.com, www.squidoo.com and www.brownielocks.com.

My favourite proofreading blunders…

7 Jan

I absolutely love seeing these errors…I hope you enjoy them too. If you have other funny ones, please let me know.  As long as they’re not mine then it’s fine!

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